Hard Cover

$24.95

The Complete Civil War Poems

A stunning and elegant 150th Anniversary Edition of Whitman's celebrated Civil War poems, accompanied by moving photographs and artwork shedding new light on this tragic but significant chapter in American history. 

Drum Taps is the complete Civil War poem collection by Walt Whitman, including the celebrated Oh, Captain, My Captain!, and augmented with Whitman's essays from the period on subjects such as Secession, Abraham Lincoln, working in the Civil War hospitals, and the assassination of the president. 

For the first time ever, each poem is set on a single page, and augmented with stunning artwork from the period: bright, rich, full-color engravings from Currier & Ives; the brooding and detailed photography of Alexander Gardner and Matthew Brady; watercolors from the battfield by Winslow Homer and other famous artists; and classic photographs and art from America’s richest collections, including the Library of Congress, the National Gallery, the George Eastman House, and many other collections.

With gorgeous, old-fashioned hot type, beautifully restored period artwork, and an authoritative introduction by Civil War historian and Pulitzer Prize-winner James McPherson, this is the richest edition of these moving and thoughtful poems by America’s greatest poet ever published.

Details

Subject: Adult, Pub. Date: 2015-11-24, Book Id: 47, ISBN: 978-1604335941, Print Size: 6 x 1.1 x 9 inches, Print Length: 272, Category: Poetry, History

Walt Whitman

Walter Whitman was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. He was a part of the transition between Transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse.

Born on Long Island, Whitman worked as a journalist, a teacher, a government clerk, and a volunteer nurse during the American Civil War in addition to publishing his poetry. Early in his career, he also produced a temperance novel, Franklin Evans (1842).

After working as clerk, teacher, journalist and laborer, Whitman wrote his masterpiece, Leaves of Grass, pioneering free verse poetry in a humanistic celebration of humanity, in 1855. Emerson, whom Whitman revered, said of Leaves of Grass that it held "incomparable things incomparably said." During the Civil War, Whitman worked as an army nurse, later writing Drum Taps (1865) and Memoranda During the War (1867). His health compromised by the experience, he was given work at the Treasury Department in Washington, D.C. After a stroke in 1873, which left him partially paralyzed, Whitman lived his next 20 years with his brother, writing mainly prose, such as Democratic Vistas (1870). Leaves of Grass was published in nine editions, with Whitman elaborating on it in each successive edition. In 1881, the book had the compliment of being banned by the commonwealth of Massachusetts on charges of immorality. A good friend of Robert Ingersoll, Whitman was at most a Deist who scorned religion. D. 1892.